Anonymous asked: Jahar was his own person. He had a mind of his own. He thought this whole thing through, considered the pros and cons, and went through with it. This line, " Now don`t get me wrong, I don`t like the thought of killing innocent civilians" implies he knew that it was morally wrong and decided to act against his own moral campus in order to achieve what he believed was justice in the eyes of Allah. This perversion of Islam. He was more knee deep in this than his brother.

ethylmylove:

patsysvodka:

I agree that he was his own person and made the choice to do this, but I don’t think he deserves to die for it.  His lawyers are fighting for his life now and they’ll blame the whole thing on Tamerlan to keep Jahar alive. 

Why do you think he was more knee deep in this than Tamerlan?

i think people sort of miss the point of this conversation sometimes. yes he most definitely is responsible for his own actions but the question is more about how he got to that point in the first place. did he think of it himself? would he have ever done anything like this without any outside influence? nobody is arguing that he doesn’t need to face the repercussions regardless of how deep he was into this, but the question of whether or not he would have ever done it without influence and how big of an influence tamerlan was or wasn’t is important, and his life literally depends on it at this point. there’s no way anyone can know if he was “more knee deep” than his brother was, though, that’s presumptuous to say he least.

aurora1990:

sayslessanddoesmore:

aurora1990:

Can anyone figure out what this is word is supposed to be?I’m just guessing here, but it looks like he has written “Our actions came with a message and this is [bullet hole] [unintelligible].”

The circled word could be ‘Illalah’ [sic] and the words before it, that were spoiled by the aperture, were probably “la ilaha”. So the the sentence might’ve been, “Our actions came with a message and this is la ilaha illalah (“there is no deity but Allah”).” *shrugs* makes sense to me…

Thank you! I spent way too long trying to figure out what that second letter was but now I can see it’s two l’s close together.

aurora1990:

sayslessanddoesmore:

aurora1990:

Can anyone figure out what this is word is supposed to be?

I’m just guessing here, but it looks like he has written “Our actions came with a message and this is [bullet hole] [unintelligible].”

The circled word could be ‘Illalah’ [sic] and the words before it, that were spoiled by the aperture, were probably “la ilaha”. So the the sentence might’ve been, “Our actions came with a message and this is la ilaha illalah (“there is no deity but Allah”).” *shrugs* makes sense to me…

Thank you! I spent way too long trying to figure out what that second letter was but now I can see it’s two l’s close together.

Anonymous asked: The whole J was his own person thing really shits me b/c the crux of his defense is that he was not able to fight back against his bro's influence due to family/cultural/physiological stuff. Can any of us really no what it would be like to have a homicidal, extremist older bro riding ur tail all the time? To no that ur bro killed his best pal + 2 others and got away with it? Even B suggested J knew, he says "the defendant may or may not have known". J was not acting freely, that is the point.

patsysvodka:

I get your frustration with the idea that Jahar was possibly a co-equal in this and was acting under zero duress.   I feel it too and it really seems hard to believe - But there is still a part of me that thinks it may be true.  I’ll go back to the photos of Jahar at the marathon - he’s soooooooo fucking relaxed!  That bothers me!   If one of them looks like they’d be likely to call off the whole thing that day I’d say it’s Tamerlan - he looked agitated, irritated and nervous.    I’m way more comfortable thinking Jahar was coerced into this.  Jahar is likeable, Tamerlan not so much.   I’ve never liked Tamerlan and I’m completely okay with them throwing him under the bus for Jahar’s defense. 

The best and most obvious move the defense can make is to put  the blame on Tamerlan.  Question is - Is this defensive tactic a true reflection of reality?  I think so, but we can’t be sure.

Anonymous asked: A bunch of people called the FBI minutes after the photos were released, people at Waikru, " Hey that`s Tam Tsarnaev, I box with him." The FBI were all over Cambridge like on the 17th...

patsysvodka:

The more I think about it, the less I’m buying the idea that the feds were all over Cambridge because the brothers were identified from the photos released by the FBI.  Let’s revisit the poor quality photos that were released to the public exactly one year ago.

image

image

The images released by the FBI on the 18th were obtained from surveillance video.  The high quality pictures taken by Bob Leonard were released later.  Sure some people from UMass Dartmouth and WaiKru thought they recognized Jahar and Tamerlan and called the FBI, but how many other people called in and thought these guys were someone else?  They must have received tons of calls from all over the country.  Did they send “feds all over the city” to every location where someone thought one of the guys in the photos was in his Poly Sci class or went to the same gym?   I doubt it.  And I don’t doubt there were FBI all over Cambridge on the 17th either.  Let’s say they did get a positive ID on the brothers from someone who recognized them from the FBI photos.  Now they know who the bombers are.  They live in Cambridge.  Why wouldn’t MIT PD be on high alert?  Why wouldn’t there be BOLOs issued for all vehicles associated with the Tsarnaevs?  Why would Watertown PD still not know who they were dealing with 8 hours after the photos were released?  Is this another case of the FBI not sharing information? 

Good point. If the FBI were certain that it was Tamerlan and Jahar before Watertown, they would have been all over UMass Dartmouth sooner. I think Larry Aaronson mentions the cops showing up on the street where they lived around 6:00 a.m. the 19th

A Year Later, MIT Officer And Cambridge Coach Recall Marathon Tragedy’s Impact On Their City

patsysvodka:

gothicfractions:

patsysvodka:

ladyjeanne:

*audio at the link

CAMBRIDGE, Mass. — A year ago Friday, the tragedy of the Boston Marathon bombing on Boylston Street three days earlier crossed the Charles River into the city of Cambridge.

It was early in the evening on April 18 when the FBI released photos of the alleged bombers — brothers Tamerlan and Dzhokhar Tsarnaev – shaking those who knew them as neighbors in Cambridge and those who remembered Dzhokhar as a high school student not long before.

A few hours later, the MIT campus shook as well.

A ‘False Security’ Before An Officer Falls

“The word was out regarding the suspects now. We knew how they looked like, and we knew they lived in the city of Cambridge at one point,” said Clarence Henniger, a sergeant with MIT police, recalling patrolling campus that evening.

“So our alert basis was not as high because the feds were all over the city of Cambridge, to some degree, knowing that they lived there,” Henniger said. “It was still not really affecting us directly in a sense. We still had this false security of MIT campus. We felt the threat here in Cambridge was gone.”

We now know the threat was not gone, as MIT Police Officer Sean Collier, working his regular beat, was shot in his cruiser, allegedly by the bombing suspects.

Henniger had driven by Collier only moments before Collier failed to respond to calls from a dispatcher. Henniger went back to check on him. This time, out of his car, he approached Collier’s cruiser.

“And as I came to the front, up to this point, I don’t know how long I may have frozen. I could not believe what I was looking at,” Henniger recalled. He was the first to reach Collier, who had been shot several times and was seriously wounded.

“At that point I backed away, and I realized what was going on. I just got on my radio and I said, ‘Officer down, officer down. Get me medical, get me back-up. Officer down.’ ”

Across Cambridge, Shock, Disbelief and Confusion Settled In

Right around the same time, across Cambridge there was shock, disbelief and confusion of a different kind settling in as word of the likely identity of the suspects reached Peter Payack, Dzhokhar Tsarnaev’s former wrestling coach at Cambridge Rindge and Latin High School.

“My son called me and he said, ‘Dad, that’s Dzhokhar.’ And I said, ‘That’s Dzhokhar?’ And I couldn’t even talk, it was like a bullet went through my chest because Dzhokhar is one of my closest wrestlers,” Payack recalled. “And it was just like, it shattered, it was like I got shot in the heart. I couldn’t talk. It was like one of these things that you can’t believe it’s really your guy. It’s Dzhokhar? And from that point on, it’s like my life took a different path.”

In the months since, Payack has said he thought Dzhokhar was not a kid who would get in trouble.

“It was just like, come on Dzhokhar, what were you thinking?” he said. “It was just like a betrayal to his community, to his high school, to his friends, his coaches. It was like a betrayal to all of us. A betrayal to the whole idea that, hey, we’re all one family. We always say, we’re one family in Cambridge.”

Payack was on the street in Watertown after the capture and watched the ambulance with Dzhokhar inside go by. He was also there months later, trying to get into the courthouse for Dzhokhar’s arraignment, but was turned away with other spectators.

These interviews were conducted by Jayne Guberman as part of the WBUR Oral History Project, a collaboration with Northeastern University’s “Our Marathon: Boston Bombing Digital Archive.”

Wait a minute, What!!!

“So our alert basis was not as high because the feds were all over the city of Cambridge, to some degree, knowing that they lived there,”

This was before Sean Collier was killed.  The Feds were all over Cambridge because they knew the suspects lived there.  How?  Are we now to believe someone finally recognized them from the marathon photos after they were released to the public?  Is this guy just confused?

I may be missing something here, but a student living in the same dorm did recognize Dzhokhar from the photos. http://articles.latimes.com/2013/apr/22/nation/la-na-nn-boston-bombing-tsarnaev-dorm-20130422

"He was driving a green Honda Civic, which was completely different from what he normally drives. I was a little thrown off,” Dell Aquila said, adding that he called the FBI after authorities released pictures of the bombing suspects.”

Ah, okay that makes sense.  Maybe the reason for the large number of feds reported in Central Square that night.  Surprised that MIT wasn’t on high alert if they knew the suspects were from Cambridge.  Wonder when the BOLO first went out for the green honda.  I know it was registered to Anzor, but you’d think they would have been on the look out for it that night.

Anonymous asked: This may be incredibly stupid to ask, but how can they release that note now?? What happened to it being used as evidence at the trial? I'm speechless right now... :/

aurora1990:

meenamaekay:

fxcknoor:

meenamaekay:

k4a-y:

somethingreallyirrelevant:

That’s not a stupid question because you’re absolutely right. The note was a key piece of hard classified evidence against Dzhokhar. Leaking it compromises both a potential trial and his fundamental rights as a defendant. I am just shocked (though in a not-shocked way, if you know what I mean lol) and dismayed that this happened.

I wonder what Judge O’Toole has to say about all this?

^

If any of you watched the NatGeo special then you’ll remember how the media made the case very difficult for the FBI. First, they released wrong information by claiming that an arrest had been made and there was a suspect in custody. They also somehow got the Tsarnaev’s pictures and forced the FBI to release them to the public earlier than expected and had tapped into the video feed of the helicopter on sight when Jahar was found and arrested. Perhaps we shouldn’t assume that the prosecution purposely had the boat note leaked.

So far no one is accusing the prosecution of leaking the boat note. All we can do is make assumptions and from the timing of it being released and the events that led up to it, all we can do is assume it was.
But I do agree with you based off of what we’ve found out from media tapping into the helicopter feed and what not, no one should be jumping into the CONCLUSION that it was the prosecution. You have to keep an open mind.
Also if you remember from the NatGeo special that they said a few times at one point that someone within the investigative unit building was leaking inside information too.

This is what ABC News reported last year when the boat note was discovered:

The discovery of writings intensified tensions between the FBI and local police when FBI agents believed some Boston officers and state police had taken cell phone pictures of the writing.

Agents demanded the phones of all officers at the scene the night of the capture of Dzhokhar be confiscated to avoid the photos becoming public before being used as evidence at trial, according to two law enforcement officials.

A FBI spokesperson said agents cannot confiscate phones without a warrant and officials said none of the police approached would agree to turn over their phones to the FBI.

^ I forgot about that

A Year Later, MIT Officer And Cambridge Coach Recall Marathon Tragedy’s Impact On Their City

*audio at the link

CAMBRIDGE, Mass. — A year ago Friday, the tragedy of the Boston Marathon bombing on Boylston Street three days earlier crossed the Charles River into the city of Cambridge.

It was early in the evening on April 18 when the FBI released photos of the alleged bombers — brothers Tamerlan and Dzhokhar Tsarnaev – shaking those who knew them as neighbors in Cambridge and those who remembered Dzhokhar as a high school student not long before.

A few hours later, the MIT campus shook as well.

A ‘False Security’ Before An Officer Falls

“The word was out regarding the suspects now. We knew how they looked like, and we knew they lived in the city of Cambridge at one point,” said Clarence Henniger, a sergeant with MIT police, recalling patrolling campus that evening.

“So our alert basis was not as high because the feds were all over the city of Cambridge, to some degree, knowing that they lived there,” Henniger said. “It was still not really affecting us directly in a sense. We still had this false security of MIT campus. We felt the threat here in Cambridge was gone.”

We now know the threat was not gone, as MIT Police Officer Sean Collier, working his regular beat, was shot in his cruiser, allegedly by the bombing suspects.

Henniger had driven by Collier only moments before Collier failed to respond to calls from a dispatcher. Henniger went back to check on him. This time, out of his car, he approached Collier’s cruiser.

“And as I came to the front, up to this point, I don’t know how long I may have frozen. I could not believe what I was looking at,” Henniger recalled. He was the first to reach Collier, who had been shot several times and was seriously wounded.

“At that point I backed away, and I realized what was going on. I just got on my radio and I said, ‘Officer down, officer down. Get me medical, get me back-up. Officer down.’ ”

Across Cambridge, Shock, Disbelief and Confusion Settled In

Right around the same time, across Cambridge there was shock, disbelief and confusion of a different kind settling in as word of the likely identity of the suspects reached Peter Payack, Dzhokhar Tsarnaev’s former wrestling coach at Cambridge Rindge and Latin High School.

“My son called me and he said, ‘Dad, that’s Dzhokhar.’ And I said, ‘That’s Dzhokhar?’ And I couldn’t even talk, it was like a bullet went through my chest because Dzhokhar is one of my closest wrestlers,” Payack recalled. “And it was just like, it shattered, it was like I got shot in the heart. I couldn’t talk. It was like one of these things that you can’t believe it’s really your guy. It’s Dzhokhar? And from that point on, it’s like my life took a different path.”

In the months since, Payack has said he thought Dzhokhar was not a kid who would get in trouble.

“It was just like, come on Dzhokhar, what were you thinking?” he said. “It was just like a betrayal to his community, to his high school, to his friends, his coaches. It was like a betrayal to all of us. A betrayal to the whole idea that, hey, we’re all one family. We always say, we’re one family in Cambridge.”

Payack was on the street in Watertown after the capture and watched the ambulance with Dzhokhar inside go by. He was also there months later, trying to get into the courthouse for Dzhokhar’s arraignment, but was turned away with other spectators.

These interviews were conducted by Jayne Guberman as part of the WBUR Oral History Project, a collaboration with Northeastern University’s “Our Marathon: Boston Bombing Digital Archive.”

nowinexile:

A woman reaches under a block from the apartheid wall trying to hold the hand of her mother on the other side. Many families have become segregated after the Israeli occupation regime completed the construction of the wall which runs through Palestinian lands. This is just one of thousands of cases. 

(via ethylmylove)